Archive ”jake”

What Daddy Wants

What Daddy Wants

December 25, 2013
Kickball

Dry plate tintype

October 21, 2013
Happy Holidays! At least Jake's got what he always wanted...

Happy Holidays!

December 23, 2012
Also taken this spring: gold-toned kallitype on arches HP 140#. Shot with a Mamiya 7, HP5+, developed in Xtol.

And this is gold toner #2 at the end of its life. Initially, toning happens very quickly - perhaps 3 minutes for the first shot I posted. This shot toned for 15 minutes and, as you can see, took on a more sepia characteristic. This is the same 250mL of toner as the previous two, and I believe this was the fourth reuse of that toner. All three of these are 11x14.

I have actually pushed this toner farther. Beyond this point, it can take a half an hour to tone a print, and I suspect it isn't as archival any longer.

Boy’s Room

July 17, 2012
From a photo walk through Durham Township a few weeks ago, this shot of the interior of the Durham Mill was taken with a Widelux F-V: a 35mm panoramic camera. Portra 800.
The extreme distortion at the edges is due to my mis-loading the film, an effect that I've since decided I like, and I keep reproducing. I'd really like to print this one on glass... perhaps after I've finished all of my other prints? Hmm.

Vague Recollection

January 30, 2012
Walked outside today while my wife and son were raking leaves, and found this seemingly-happy bird nesting in one pile... good thing it left before I started shredding them!
In casein-land, I've got a pile of plastic on its way for backlights. When they get here, I expect to have at least one print to post (it's sitting on my window now waiting for a backlight). Progress made on one other print this weekend, but I ran out of time while dealing with other photo processing obligations. Ah well, there's always next weekend...

Nesting

November 20, 2011
Jake, plotting his overthrow of the steampunk world. MwaHAhahaha

Steampunk Jake

October 2, 2011
Made with a homemade matchbox pinhole camera, shot on Acros 100, and developed in DD-X. Almost all of my shots were terribly over-exposed, which I find rather unbelievable but undeniable. Next year I'll need a faster shutter. Which is to say finger-over-the-pinhole. :)

Worldwide Pinhole …

April 26, 2011
This one takes some explaining; it's some of what's been eating up my time for the past few weeks.
This shot started life on HP5+ developed in Xtol. I digitally inverted and enlarged the shot and printed it on Pictorico Ultra Premium OHP before stuffing it in to my vacuum frame (yes, that shot shows me mis-printing a positive I printed first - oops).
Traditionally, Cyanotype has a "part A" (green ferric ammonium citrate) and a "part B" (Potassium Ferricyanide). Usually you mix equal parts together, put it on paper, dry it, and expose it to UV light for a few minutes (outside) to an hour (under a UV light). Results are generally high-contrast and very very blue.
This print was made with an alternative method - reportedly the same one that Sir John Hershel used, which has been generally forgotten. I stumbled across an old thread on some forum or other last week where this was mentioned in passing and decided I had to give it a try: instead of mixing parts A and B, you just coat the paper in part A and then expose it. Afterward you develop it in part B, and then wash it with water. The results are a substantially lower contrast print with excellent tonality.
After initial printing, this was a typical cyanotype blue. I soaked it in coffee for about an hour to give it this final tone. My next print was going to be bleached (in borax or ammonia) and then toned (with coffee or tea) - but I broke my UV lamp instead, so that will have to wait a few days. I'm using a backup UV lamp that's not nearly as bright and am printing 31-step wedges to see just how well this new technique works.
Of course this raised another set of questions for me: Mike Ware created a "New Cyanotype" recipe that is faster and offers a greater tonal range. (I use this too, and have to admit that it seems superior in many ways.) I have to wonder if it's possible to use Ammonium Iron(III) Oxalate mixed with Ammonium Dichromate like the traditional "part A", and then develop in Potassium Ferricyanide (same as the traditional "part B"). I think I'll have to try this out the next time I mix up a new batch!

It’s That Si…

March 28, 2011
Most of my shots recently seem to be of this fella, and I've grown a bit reluctant to keep posting him... but I just can't resist this one. Had I gotten to developing film today, perhaps I would have posted something else. Perhaps tomorrow. :)
In other news, the Epson 4000 is alive and well, despite my best attempts to destroy it by completely disassembling the print head today. Replaced a damper, forced some ammonia+water through the matte black channel (below the damper), and it's better than before. Still not quite perfect, and I'll probably have to do the same again as it definitely improved things, but *damn* do the prints look good, even with a couple of nozzles that are misfiring a tiny tiny bit. I know that crazy perfectionist me will wind up flushing it again anyway.

A Bit of Snow

February 5, 2011
Ilford HP5+, Microphen. This shot was rescued from a roll that I terribly over-developed (... apparently 18 minutes at 75 degrees is too long for EI 12500).
Back story: Jake loves museums. Unlike his dad, he prefers Academy of Natural Sciences over the Franklin Institute. So we go there as often as I can arrange, which leads to walking across town pretending that we're dinosaurs. QED.
Shot on the 1947 Bessa 66, which I'm happy to say is still working quite well. Unlike the 1938 version (hole in bellows); the early 1930s version (lousy 3-blade shutter that's not really worth repairing, and film advance that's dead); and the late-30s Brillant (shutter recently failed, and I need to open it up again). The 1950s Ricohs are still holding up fairly well, although I haven't paid them much attention as of late (it's either the Mamiya 7 or the Bessa). The recent hooplah around Vivian Maier makes me want to dig out the TLRs, so maybe I'll be getting back to them soon...

Velociraptor Jake

January 9, 2011
Yes, I still shoot digital, too. Sometimes.

Pancakes Are Good …

December 30, 2010
I'm still getting used to having a computer that doesn't crash randomly any more - the ability to dive in, find a shot, and post it feels totally alien. (Thanks Apple for replacing my old lemon. Freezing randomly multiple times a day is no fun.)
Anywho: this is from our recent excursion to Germany. The noise is inexplicable 5D sensor noise. Two years ago, I'd be really annoyed. Now, I like it; it's part of the shot.
And for those that might complain about the title: remember that I'm red/green color blind? Yeah, that. The only color I see in this shot is blue, really. My wife says there's red in (between?) those bricks somewhere, and that they're kinda mostly gray. I don't see it.

Study In Blue

December 21, 2010
One of the most wonderful parts of visiting family in Germany was watching Jake interact with all of them. Like this superhero battle, where (seemingly) Spider-Man is doing battle with Lava Boy [sic].
Acros 100 in Microphen.

Super Powers

November 21, 2010
Finally catching up on a boatload of scanning, and I keep finding stuff I like. Like this one of Jake and me having a hayfight at the Harvest Festival a few weeks ago.
HP5, DD-X.

Harvest Festival H…

October 20, 2010
Proving that I'm still alive (or that some clever facsimile thereof is able to post to my photoblog): Acros 100 + Microphen. Which, should you try to Google for it, The Goog will auto-correct to "Microphone."
This combination of film + developer is off the charts for me. The tonal range, contrast, and incredibly fine grain really pop. I suspect you'll see more of this combo...

Where Did I Leave …

October 18, 2010

Blog Posts Feed (RSS)